1. Trivalent cations cause a collodion membrane covered with a protein film to be charged positively while they do not produce such an effect on collodion membranes not possessing a protein film. The same had been found for the reversal of the sign of charge of the membrane by acid.

2. This reversal in the sign of charge of the membrane by trivalent cations occurs on the alkaline side of the isoelectric point of the protein used; while the reversal by acid occurs on the acid side of the isoelectric point.

3. The reversal seems to be due to or to be accompanied in both cases by a chemical change in the protein. The chemical change which occurs when the hydrogen ions reverse the sign of charge of the protein film consists in the formation of a protein-acid salt whereby the H ion becomes part of a complex protein cation; while the chemical change which occurs when trivalent cations reverse the sign of charge of the protein film consists in the formation of an insoluble and therefore sparingly or non-ionizable metal proteinate.

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