The ability of guinea pigs to form immune responses specific for each of the random copolymers, L-glutamic acid and L-alanine (GA) and L-glutamic acid and L-tyrosine (GT), is under the control of distinct autosomal dominant genes. By testing for the ability to respond to these copolymers among the progeny from the reciprocal backcross mating of responder (2 x 13)F1 animals with the appropriate nonresponder parental strain, we have demonstrated that different unigenic autosomal dominant traits control the ability to respond to GA and GT respectively. The data further shows that the GA gene is linked to the poly-L-lysine (PLL) gene and to the locus determining the major strain 2 histocompatibility specificities and that the GT gene is linked to the locus controlling the expression of major strain 13 histocompatibility specificities.

Analysis of the inheritance of the GT and PLL genes among the offspring from a mating of responder (2 x 13)F1 guinea pigs with random-bred guinea pigs unable to respond to GT or PLL demonstrate that these genes segregate away from each other. Thus, the PLL gene and the genes to which it is linked, the GA gene and the major strain 2 histocompatibility locus, behave as alleles or pseudoalleles to the GT gene and the major strain 13 histocompatibility locus.

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