The regulation of the synthesis of muscle-specific proteins has been examined in BC3H1 cells, a smooth muscle-like cell line isolated by Schubert et al. (J. Cell Biol., 1974, 61: 398-413.). The synthesis of both creatine kinase and the acetylcholine receptor appear to be under dual control, a positive control due to cell-cell contact which increases the rate of synthesis of this protein, and a negative signal, elicited by serum components, that decreases the rate of synthesis of these proteins. Induction of muscle-specific proteins in BC3H1 cells is a reversible process and can be arrested after partial induction has taken place by the addition of serum or high-molecular-weight protein fraction from serum to these cells. The high-molecular-weight protein fraction from serum is not by itself mitogenic for Bc3H1 cells and cannot be replaced by a variety of known hormones (mitogenic factors).

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