1. A method is given by which the amount of equivalents of metal in combination with 1 gm. of a 1 per cent gelatin solution previously treated with an alkali can be ascertained when the excess of alkali is washed away and the pH is determined. The curves of metal equivalent in combination with 1 gm. of gelatin previously treated with different concentrations of LiOH, NaOH, KOH, NH4OH, Ca(OH)2, and Ba(OH)2 were ascertained and plotted as ordinates, with the pH of the solution as abscissæ, and were found to be identical. This proves that twice as many univalent as bivalent cations combine with the same mass of gelatin, as was to be expected.

2. The osmotic pressure of 1 per cent solutions of metal gelatinates with univalent and bivalent cation was measured. The curves for the osmotic pressure of 1 per cent solution of gelatin salts of Li, Na, K, and NH4 were found to be identical when plotted for pH as abscissæ, tending towards the same maximum of a pressure of about 325 mm. of the gelatin solution (for pH about 7.9). The corresponding curves for Ca and Ba gelatinate were also found to be identical but different from the preceding ones, tending towards a maximum pressure of about 125 mm. for pH about 7.0 or above. The ratio of maxi mal osmotic pressure for the two groups of gelatin salts is therefore about as 1:3 after the necessary corrections have been made.

3. When the conductivities of these solutions are plotted as ordinates against the pH as abscissæ, the curves for the conductivities of Li, Na, Ca, and Ba gelatinate are almost identical (for the same pH), while the curves for the conductivities of K and NH4 gelatinate are only little higher.

4. The curves for the viscosity and swelling of Ba (or Ca) and Na gelatinate are approximately parallel to those for osmotic pressure.

5. The practical identity or close proximity of the conductivities of metal gelatinates with univalent and bivalent metal excludes the possibility that the differences observed in the osmotic pressure, viscosity, and swelling between metal gelatinates with univalent and bivalent metal are determined by differences in the degree of ionization (and a possible hydratation of the protein ions).

6. Another, as yet tentative, explanation is suggested.

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