1. When we plot the values of osmotic pressure, swelling, and viscosity of gelatin solutions as ordinates over the pH as abscissæ, practically identical curves are obtained for the effect of monobasic acids (HCl, HBr, HNO3, and acetic acid) on these properties.

2. The curves obtained for the effect of H2SO4 on gelatin are much lower than those obtained for the effect of monobasic acids, the ratio of maximal osmotic pressures of a 1 per cent solution of gelatin sulfate and gelatin bromide being about 3:8. The same ratio had been found for the ratio of maximal osmotic pressures of calcium and sodium gelatinate.

3. The curves representing the influence of other dibasic and tribasic acids, viz. oxalic, tartaric, succinic, citric, and phosphoric, upon gelatin are almost identical with those representing the effect of monobasic acids.

4. The facts mentioned under (2) and (3) permit us to decide between a purely chemical and a colloidal explanation of the influence of acids on the physical properties of gelatin. In the former case we should be able to prove, first, that twice as many molecules of HBr as of H2SO4 combine with a given mass of gelatin; and, second, that the same number of molecules of phosphoric, citric, oxalic, tartaric, and succinic acids as of HNO3 or HCl combine with the same mass of gelatin. It is shown in the present paper that this is actually the case.

5. It is shown that gelatin sulfate and gelatin bromide solutions of the same pH have practically the same conductivity. This disproves the assumption of colloid chemists that the difference in the effect of bromides and sulfates on the physical properties of gelatin is due to a different ionizing and hydratating effect of the two acids upon the protein molecule.

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