1. In Bryophyllum calycinum two apical leaves suppress the shoot formation in all the dormant buds situated basally from the leaf; one apical leaf suppresses the shoot formation in the basal buds situated in the same half of the stem where the leaf is, and, if one-half of the petiole of such a leaf is removed, the growth of basal buds in one quadrant of the stem is suppressed.

2. This inhibitory influence of a leaf upon shoot formation in the basal part of a stem is diminished or disappears when the mass of the leaf is reduced below a certain limit.

3. The inhibitory influence of an apical leaf upon the growth of shoots in horizontally suspended stems is greater when the leaf is on the upper than when it is on the lower side of the stem.

4. All these facts suggest the possibility that the inhibitory influence of the leaf upon shoot formation is due to inhibitory substances secreted by the leaf and carried by the sap from the leaf towards the base of the stem.

5. An apical leaf accelerates root formation in the basal part of a stem and this accelerating effect increases with the mass of the leaf.

6. This inhibitory influence of a leaf upon shoot formation and the favoring influence upon root formation in the more basally situated parts of the stem is one of the factors determining the polar character of regeneration.

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