Further studies of ascitic fluid production and related factors in dogs with constriction of the vena cava above the diaphragm are reported.

Whole dog plasma given intravenously to such animals produces a rise in circulating plasma protein to normal levels, but increases the output of ascitic fluid with a loss of protein via the ascites equivalent to 72, 76, and 65 per cent respectively, of the injected protein.

Forced ingestion of water in excess of the test animal's normal needs and desires produces no significant changes in the circulating plasma protein level or in ascitic fluid production.

Amino acid growth mixtures given intravenously in distilled water cause weight loss, elevation of circulating plasma proteins, a slightly negative nitrogen balance, but no ascitic fluid production.

Amino acid growth mixtures given intravenously in normal saline cause depression of the circulating plasma proteins, negative nitrogen balance, and significant ascitic fluid production.

Ascitic fluid given intravenously to the test animals causes a marked depression of circulating plasma proteins, a marked increase in ascitic fluid production containing the equivalent of 116 and 98 per cent of the injected protein, and a negative nitrogen balance.

Ascitic fluid given orally produces a marked depression of circulating plasma proteins, and a marked increase in ascitic fluid secretion, containing the equivalent of 66, 66, and 54 per cent respectively, of the ingested protein.

Sodium chloride is a dominant factor in some of these experiments where abundant ascites production is recorded. Protein levels and intake are important, but take second place to sodium.

Ascitic fluids show electrophoretic patterns which are almost identical to the plasma patterns. The A/G ratios are often equal in ascitic fluid and plasma, sometimes even lower in the ascitic fluid. This emphasizes the ease with which globulins pass cell or other membrane barriers in these experiments.

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