From the study of a large series of rabbits with outspoken manifestations of generalized syphilis, lesions of the skin and appendages were found to constitute one of the largest and most varied groups of such affections. The conditions noted consisted of alopecias, onychia and paronychia, and lesions of the skin proper.

It was found to be a matter of some difficulty to make a positive diagnosis of syphilitic alopecia, but there were three and possibly four conditions which appeared to be attributable to such an infection. The first of these took the form of a general or local roughening of the coat with falling of the hair which produced the typical moth-eaten appearance associated with syphilitic alopecia in the human subject. A second form of alopecia was essentially an abnormal looseness of the hair which permitted large areas of the body to be completely denuded. The third type of alopecia was associated with definite skin changes, and the hair was readily removable together with an adherent mass of epithelial scales.

Paronychia was comparatively rare but was readily recognized by a characteristic infiltration and exfoliation of the skin about the base of the nails.

The incidence of onychia is uncertain. Late in the course of the investigation it was found that alterations in the nails which were not entirely characteristic in themselves might occur in consequence of a syphilitic involvement of the nail beds which could not be detected by ordinary methods of examination. The cases which were recognized as syphilitic were those which showed an associated paronychia.

Lesions of the skin were found to be one of the most frequent manifestations of a generalized infection in the rabbit. These lesions were divided into three classes: first, granulomatous lesions, second, infiltrations, and third, erythemata.

The granulomata were lesions of a fleshy character which tended to grow to a very large size and presented all the characteristics of circumscribed primary lesions of the scrotum.

The conditions described as cutaneous infiltrations included two general types of lesions, one a flattened and rather diffuse process, the other an elevated and sharply circumscribed papule. As a class, these lesions were very prone to secondary alterations and in this way gave rise to a great variety of conditions which in general resembled the diffuse primary lesions of the scrotum and the papular lesions resulting from local dissemination.

A third type of lesion resembling the macular erythemata of man was observed in a small number of animals, and while no definite proof of the specific origin of these lesions was obtained, the evidence available was strongly suggestive.

In addition, several other cutaneous affections were noted which have not as yet been thoroughly investigated. It is suggested, however, that these processes may bear some relation to infection with Treponema pallidum.

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