The human cytokine interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is a small glycoprotein secreted by activated T cells, monocytes, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, and is structurally related to a family of chemotactic cytokines called chemokines. Although this protein is present in sites of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lepromatous leprosy lesions, the biological activity of IP-10 remains unknown. We report here that recombinant human IP-10 stimulated significant in vitro chemotaxis of human peripheral blood monocytes but not neutrophils. Recombinant human IP-10 also stimulated chemotaxis of stimulated, but not unstimulated, human peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the stimulated T cell population responsive to IP-10 demonstrated that stimulated CD4+ and CD29+ T cells migrated in response to IP-10. This resembles the biological activity of the previously described T cell chemoattractant RANTES. Using an endothelial cell adhesion assay, we demonstrated that stimulated T cells pretreated with optimal doses of IP-10 exhibited a greatly enhanced ability to bind to an interleukin 1-treated endothelial cell monolayer. These results demonstrate that the IP-10 gene encodes for an inflammatory mediator that specifically stimulates the directional migration of T cells and monocytes as well as potentiates T cell adhesion to endothelium.

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