1. Tolerance of male skin isografts has been regularly produced in female mice of the C57B1 strain sublines 1, 4, and 6 during adult life by repeated injection of completely disrupted spleen cells derived from male donors. The tolerant state is long-lasting since such grafts have remained in place more than 9 months.

2. Prolonged survival of homotransplants of skin has regularly been produced in DBA/2 mice during adult life by repeated injections of completely disrupted spleen cells from Balb/C donors. When injections of disrupted spleen cell material are continued over a sufficiently long period, permanent acceptance of the skin homografts may be obtained between these strains.

3. Immunological tolerance across even the strong H-2 histocompatibility barrier was obtained in the neonatal period and during adult life by repeated injection of disrupted spleen cell preparations. The tolerant state has been revealed by both mammary adenocarcinoma and skin homografting across this strong histocompatibility barrier.

4. In contradistinction to the tolerant state produced by injection of intact spleen cells in neonatal animals or during adult life or that produced by parabiotic union, the tolerance produced by repeated injection of disrupted spleen cell preparations cannot be transferred to syngenic neonatal mice with spleen cells of the tolerant animal.

5. The implications of these findings in transplantation biology and in consideration of the basic nature of tolerance are discussed.

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