1. Saturated solutions of sulfur in alcohol (alcohol-sulfur) when diluted with broth are inhibitory to the growth of various Gram-positive bacteria and to C. hominis. By an arbitrary method of unitage with S. aureus as the test organism, our alcohol-sulfur contains 1,600 to 2,000 units per cc. and one unit contains between 0.24 and 0.34 gamma sulfur. The activity of a preparation is in general directly proportional to its sulfur content.

2. Solutions of sulfur in carbowax (carbowax-sulfur) when diluted with broth are likewise inhibitory to the growth of various Gram-positive bacteria and to C. hominis. When S. aureus is used as test organism, 1 unit contains between 0.1 and 0.2 gamma sulfur. The activity of these preparations is also in general directly proportional to their sulfur content.

3. Carbowax-sulfur when incorporated in agar in 1–500 to 1–2,000 dilution inhibits the growth of various Gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, C. hominis, and certain dermatophytes.

4. Our experiments appear to show that both alcohol-sulfur and carbowax-sulfur owe their inhibitory properties to the sulfur particles that are dispersed throughout the medium when these sulfur preparations are diluted with broth. The inhibitory effect of these particles may or may not be due to a combination of the sulfur particles with substances in the medium in which they are suspended.

5. Evidence suggests that the activity of both alcohol-sulfur and carbowax-sulfur is due to sulfur in the same form. The inhibitory effect is characterized by prolonged bacteriostasis with similar activity over a wide range of dilutions.

There is no evidence of true bactericidal action even with the highest concentrations used.

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